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36v dc aircraft ballast?

36v dc aircraft ballast?

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dc ballast

12v_ballast.jpg 24v_ballast.jpg 36v_ballast.jpg oldlight.jpg

Light Information

Light Information

Manufacturer:mark iv/luminator
Model Reference:81023400
Lamp
Lamp Type:t8 or t12
Base:bipin
Fixture
Ballast Type:electronic
Electrical
Wattage:2x40
Current:400 ma/lamp

File information

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Filename:36v_ballast.jpg
Album name:toomanybulbs / misc stuff
Keywords:Gear
File Size:259 KB
Date added:Feb 27, 2011
Dimensions:2048 x 1150 pixels
Displayed:308 times
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Feb 28, 2011 at 09:50 PM Author:
I checked from the net the voltage of aircraft is 28v DC but typically 24v DC rating for electrical components on board and some have 115v 400Hz ac so I guess this ballast was meant for some standby use where there is a battery bank. I've seen electronic ballast having dual voltage one for normal ac use and another for DC use which is like 100< volts.
Medved
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Mar 01, 2011 at 01:10 AM Author: Medved
30 or 40W T8/T12 sounds for me rather large bulbs for an aircraft, there are rather used thinner T5.
I would rather guess these to be railway ballasts, 36V is rather common for older passenger cars illumination (for those with no external power source, using own generators)

No more selfballasted c***

SeanB~1
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Mar 01, 2011 at 10:49 AM Author: SeanB~1
Aircraft pretty much use a battery of 28V, the only exception being light aviation which often uses a 12V system only. Instrumentation and such generally require a 115VAC 400Hz 3 phase supply, almost invariably used in a delta configuration ( though the generator is star connected to enable a safety ground for the supply) with a tolerance of around 105-125VAC and 380-420Hz on the supply. The battery supply is only used for starting, lighting and some loads ( radio receiver and standby instruments) whilst the rest are run off the AC bus. Fluorescent lights would be run off the AC bus via a choke or resistive ballast in most cases, but long linear fluorescent tubes are not common due to the vibration in flight. Incandescent and now LED lighting is the more common style, with a few electroluminescent panels in use, as they are perfect to run from the AC bus with no need for an inverter.
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Mar 08, 2011 at 12:48 PM Author: suzukir122
400 mA... that's interesting. It even has the same wiring diagram
as a rapid start... I think. LOL

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Medved
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Mar 08, 2011 at 11:48 PM Author: Medved
@suzukir122: This connection is common for all ballasts using voltage mode electrode heating...

No more selfballasted c***

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