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2 Stroke International diesel engine

2 Stroke International diesel engine

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Not lighting related really....yet, but this will hopefully soon power a generator. It is a 10 horsepower, 6600 RPM 2 stroke multi fuel engine made by 2 Stroke International in Beaufort, South Carolina. I bought three of these and one of the 2 stroke gasoline ones. The gasoline one can run in either direction, so it will go on a golf cart I have. At least one diesel will go on a generator. Diesel is certified to run on #1 or 2 diesel, and JP8 or JP5. Runs great on my 50% waste cooking oil blend too! :)
Yea, I know it is not directly lighting related, but I live in a rural area and we have to worry about standby power. This will be versatile for a generator....to power my array of preheat fluorescents, of course! ;)

2011-11-22_18-46-58_501.jpg 2011-10-26_18-37-02_467.jpg 2011-08-04_20-20-12_557.jpg 2011-08-02_21-12-15_54.jpg

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yuandrew
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Aug 04, 2011 at 10:43 PM Author: yuandrew
A "diesel" but I noticed it has 2 spark plugs.

I've read you could make a generator head using an induction motor and some large value run capacitors in parallel. There's a "universal" run capacitor with multiple taps called the Turbo 200 available from HVAC supply houses that you'd find handy for the project.
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jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Aug 04, 2011 at 11:32 PM Author: DieselNut
You are very observant! Yes, it is a totally unique design! It has two ignition coils, two spark plugs and a glow plug. It only uses the spark plugs to help it get warm. Once it is running stable, you can "kill" the ignition power and it runs fine. The glow plug is for cold climate starts. The little timing belt runs a piston that draws in the fuel, pre compresses and atomizes it just before it goes into the combustion chamber. It uses automatically fed 2 stroke oil to lubicate both "crank cases". It is very interesting for sure. I may have to make some sort of a custom generator for it. It is designed to pretty much run half throttle to wide open, so it would be great with the right kind of generator setup. More info is available at www.2si.com

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Aug 04, 2011 at 11:45 PM Author: icefoglights
I've never seen a 2-stroke diesel that small! That must be the blower on top.

Ski-Doo sells a snowmobile that takes advantage of 2-stroke gas engine's ability to run in either direction. A reverse switch would cause the engine to change directions on-the-fly to provide reverse drive. A governor limited power available while in reverse.

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Aug 05, 2011 at 04:48 AM Author: Medved
With the waste cooking oil a fuel you would have to deal with the build up of a kind of epoxy, mainly around the injector nozzle. Quite nasty stuff and very difficult to clean out, as it is quite inert to most available solvents...
Does this engine have a speed governor? Without that it would be very difficult to maintain correct speed for the generator, mainly the induction ones are quite sensitive...

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Aug 05, 2011 at 05:48 AM Author: Ash
But then you could rectify the output to DC and make nice clean modified sine AC out of it with inverter
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Aug 05, 2011 at 06:15 AM Author: Medved
The modified sinewave is not good for direct, mains frequency ballasts. You have to use either the real sinewave (universal for all ballasts), of if used only with lag ballasts all of the same type and same lamps, the 1:1 rectangle suit way better (of course, the PFC capacitors have to be disconnected), but then you would have to tune the voltage/frequency to get the correct lamp current. Good start would be 0.9*rms value of the original sinewave (108V for 120V, 207V for 230V) and the original frequency (60 or 50Hz).
And even then you would have troubles with maintaining reasonable speed: All engines tend to increase their power (=torque*speed) at higher rpm, while the load would be of constant power (so the load torque = Power / rpm), so you would need a kind of governor (but with the DC intermediate not as accurate as with the directly generated AC) anyway. But if these engines were intended for some power tools, they should already include some kind of governor (but it would still not keep the rpm really independent of load), so it would be possible to make working system...

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Aug 05, 2011 at 06:28 AM Author: Ash
CFLs (and i think everything with HF ballast) will run on either wave shape, and probably accept quite wide range of frequency

240V CFLs can be run on DC (i dont know about 120V CFLs, i guess you have to remove the doubler and supply 240V DC, if there is nothing connected to the midpoint of the doubler), then no inverter is needed at all

Now if this generator is to power stuff like fridge and power tools (what i suppose emergency generator to be used for besides lighting), modified wave sounds like better option than square wave

240V preheat fluorescents and HPS seem to work ok on modified sine wave (with square the fluorescent starter is heating when the lamp is allready lit, HPS is cycling)
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Aug 05, 2011 at 06:38 AM Author: DieselNut
@ Medved, yes, it has a speed governor, although it is air operated, so not very stable, much like gas (petrol) eengines this size. I have been running the 50% diesel/ waste cooking oil blend in my 1996 model Dodge truck for years with zero problems. I read the horror storries like you mentioned, so I got a spare set of used injectors, but I think the horror stories are more likely when people use 100% waste cooking oil.
I am always amazed at the amount of knowledge y'all have here!

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Aug 05, 2011 at 10:41 AM Author: Medved
@Ash: The DC voltage for the 240V CFL's is 280..300VDC (peak value minus half of the bus capacitor ripple), same for 120V ones originally equipped with the doubler. 120V ones without doubler (lower wattage) need 140..150VDC.
If the HF ballast have an active PFC, the DC voltage should be in the rated AC rms value range.
With the square I aqssumed it would be used only for experiments. For real decent backup power generation purpose I would use decent sinewave inverter, as the variety of supplied equipment would be really wide and there is no other universal shape.
Or (what may be easier), make an accurate electronic governor (altering the pre-tensoion of the spring on the existing mechanical one) and decent synchronous generator. With that you do not have to deal with any power electronic at all...


@DieselNut: It mean, then I would better not eat anything fried in such oil before. If the cooking oil is old and well "cooked" (overheated,...), the epoxy-like substance already deposited out on the "crispy" french fries or (more likely ) on the fryer heating element. So then there are no "ingredients" in the oil to form it again...
And it depend on the amount of sulfur in the Diesel fuel you are using, as the sulfur is quite important element in the epoxy buildup. It is true, then the sulfur is these days on purpose removed from the fuel, so there are generally less problems with the epoxy formations... You should take care, then even the lubrication oil is sulfur-free (= "bio-fuel ready"), as it may deliver it to the space and the epoxy may still form...

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jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Aug 05, 2011 at 10:58 AM Author: DieselNut
@Medved, this is BEAUTIFUL cooking oil. She changes the oil in both fryers weekly, so it is very clean! I also let it settle, then filter it before blending. I filter it again as it is pumped into the vehicle or equipment's tank.
The lube oil is ultra clean, designed for marine outboard engines. All of our diesel fuel is 15 ppm sulfur, designated as "Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel" (ULSD).
I have some friends wanting these engines, so I will probably pick up three more this weekend!
A friend/neighbor wants to set up a generator also. He loves lighting and electrical also and I am getting him into diesel power.
By the way, the engine was running at full speed in this photo.

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Aug 05, 2011 at 03:33 PM Author: nogden
I've always wanted to build a generator using some kind of small engine (probably a lawn mower engine) and use car alternators (because I have many extras!). I also bought a big inverter that I would use for 120V. Most of my equipment and lights will run on 12V DC, however (ham radio equip and "RV" incandescent lamps), so 120V is not so critical.
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Aug 06, 2011 at 07:08 AM Author: Medved
@nogden: Alternators gave one problem: They need a properly sized battery to operate (all car alternators need priming - in "9-diode" configuration ensured via the check-bulb, and the voltage regulation tend to collapse without voltage stabilizing load).
Old fashioned dynamos were way better in that matter, the thing they need is to rotate their shaft. So when the engine stop, there is automatically no consumption from the battery... Of course, you should use 3-coil regulator (one coil is the reverse relay, second voltage regulator and the 3'rd current limit regulator; thys type offer excellent voltage regulation), or on the two-coil (the voltage and current limit are merged into one coil to save money) type bypass the current limiting coil from the voltage regulation winding (as the two-coil type let the output voltage to decrease with load current). If the ballast resistor and dynamo speed are set properly, only the first regulation stage (bypassing the excitation winding ballast resistor) would act, so set the voltage so, then this stage regulate at the 14V, let the second stage (shorting the excitation winding) to act only at higher voltages (~14.5..15V), as it would be needed only in emergencies (overspeed, load disconnect,...)

Moreover dynamos offer better efficiency, when the speed may be optimized for them (the alternator's wide rpm operation range is useless here).

What may help is to use the magneto's auxiliary winding (if it is there) to generate ~6V for alternator priming - then you would not need the switch to avoid priming current to discharge the batteries, when the engine is stopped and you forget to switch the priming OFF...

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Aug 08, 2011 at 08:45 AM Author: DieselNut
Love reading yall's input here. I want to set up a little generator with this, and have a neighbor that wants one for his farm. He only needs enough to run his refrigerator and maybe a light in the barn.

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Aug 08, 2011 at 01:55 PM Author: Medved
I just got an idea, that would work only with alternators:
On alternators the excitation current is very highly dependent on the load current. So if you would be able to make an electromagnet, what would by this current alter the governor setting, you may in quite simple way make the governor to follow the load: On light load regulate on lower rpm, while the set rpm would increase with the load till it reach the maximum (= present) setting (~3000rpm at no load, gradually rising to the present 4500rpm @ ~60% load, then there would be a kind of limit to not allow to rise further, so the 4500rpm would stay til 100% load).
The reduced rpm at light load would then greatly reduce the fuel consumption, engine loading and wear, as in my experience, these generators run most of the time only lightly loaded...

With the dynamo this would be way more difficult, as the excitation winding current is rather independent on the load (it is mainy dependent on the actual rpm, assume it is regulated to constant output voltage)...

But to utilize the 10hp, you would need about 300..400A load on the 14V level (assume the alternator efficiency about 60..80%), what I doubt is realistic load on such low voltage, it would require ~3..4 100A alternators to work in parallel and really HUGE battery.

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Aug 08, 2011 at 08:28 PM Author: Alights
nice 2 stroke engine! i have a montgomery ward generator here http://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-35959

also this might be dumb question: do diesel engines use oil? ive never had any experience with them

i repair lawn mowers people throw out in the neighborhood, and resell them usually , its only simple problems like bad electrical connections or even dull blades!! people here throw all kinds of stuff out! makes me sick!
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Aug 08, 2011 at 10:25 PM Author: DieselNut
@medved, again, I LOVE your knowledge on all things electrical!
@Alights, this one uses two stroke outboard engine oil. It has a separate little 1 liter tank (sitting on the chair barely visible in the top of the photo) and the .5 liter soda bottle is holding the fuel in the test run. Normally, diesels use oil in a similar fashion as a gasoline engine, where it stays in the crankcase for lubrication purposes and is pumped throughout the other moving parts. This one "consumes" a small amount, just like an older style 2 cycle motorcycle, golf cart or snow mobile/ATV, where it is fed via a little pump into the cylinder. It uses very little oil or fuel though.

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Aug 09, 2011 at 01:35 AM Author: AngryHorse
Great engine John , Internationals are few and far between here, a generator is a fantastic idea, and it will load it well, you may find it uses LESS fuel when running under load.

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Aug 11, 2011 at 10:29 PM Author: yuandrew
I wonder if the exhaust smells like French fries or popcorn (when you're running the cooking oil mix)
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Aug 11, 2011 at 11:09 PM Author: DieselNut
@yuandew, they definitely smell like something cooking. I have been running the 50% blend in my 1996 Dodge truck with the Cummins engine for years. It "likes" it better than these smaller engines with lower compression. My little 3500 watt generator does fine with it as long as it is not during the Winter. I could refine the oil into true biodiesel, but that is very time consuming. This should make a nice little generator engine.

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Aug 19, 2011 at 04:55 PM Author: Kev
My friend was once running his Peugeot 306 D Turbo on a cooking oil mix. As it is colder here the cooking oil became cold and started going thick. This made life hard for the diesel pump and blew it! I dont think the car ever ran the same after that! Problem is i think he was using a more 70-30%cooking oil! new though!

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Aug 20, 2011 at 01:42 AM Author: icefoglights
That's one issue I've heard about biodiesel is it gels at much higher temps than petroleum diesel. In the climate here, keeping a regular diesel running in the winter can be difficult without preheating and fuel treatments.

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Aug 20, 2011 at 05:50 AM Author: DieselNut
Yes, it is not a good Winter thing. I use a less concentrated blend in Winter.

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Aug 20, 2011 at 01:55 PM Author: Medved
For using the vegetable oil in colder environment (so below ~18degC if 100%) you need preheating of the whole fuel system, otherwise it will clog the filter...

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Nov 19, 2013 at 08:03 PM Author: ace100w120v
Interesting thread here...
I know nothing about the cooking oil thing but it seems like a good idea...
As for the sine-wave, I thought modified sine wave and square wave were/are the same thing? Or are they different? I know the power you get from a good, well-adjusted generator, the grid, or a high-quality inverter is pure sine wave, but aren't square and modified sine different names for the same thing? In my experience most things (Preheat and rapid start fluorescents, CFLs, motor-driven power tools, most consumer electronics, etc. run just fine although things may "buzz". The only things in my house that don't like it are some DeWalt power tool battery chargers...but for those I can start the generator which is pure sine wave of course.
In my case 120v is pretty critical but if I were to rewire my house I'd make most non-linear-fluorescent lights 12v along with other basic appliances and save the inverter for only when it's needed...maybe a small (100w or less) one for the answering machine/cordless phone but save my big 2000w one for only when it's needed...(Watching TV, surfing this site, etc.)
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Nov 20, 2013 at 11:35 AM Author: Medved
The square wave is changing plus and minus polarity with nmo intermediate steps, so e.g. +230/-230/+230/-230/... (to have 230V rms). This is not usable in replacing the sinewave, because it will either overload transformers (the peak magnetic flux will correspond to 250Vrms sinewave) and at the same time the peak voltage (so output of the simple rectifiers) is only 230V (instead of the 325V of a sinewave).

"Modified sinewave" is +325/0/-325/0/+325/0/... This scheme is designed so, the inverter still suffice with simple low frequency switching, but the rms and peak voltages are equal to the corresponding (230Vrms for that case) sinewave voltage. The peak flux in a transformer is ~10% less than with the sinewave, what is of no problem for most low power equipment.
Here is very important the "0V" section, it really have to be enforced by actively shorting switches in the inverter, just keep the load open circuit mean the transformers flux will decay there and would saturate in the next active power pulse.
But still it contain high dV/dt slopes, what cause problems with capacitors.

Generators usually create something between a trapezoid, triangle and sinewave, it depend on the exact core shaping and load (inductive, capacitive, light, heavy,...). But usually the output impedance is rather high, so the exact shape adopt to what the load is enforcing. (trapezoidal for rectifier, sinewave for PF compensated lamp ballast,...)

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Nov 20, 2013 at 08:33 PM Author: ace100w120v
hmm...
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Mar 14, 2014 at 03:01 PM Author: ricksbulbs
I just got a diaphragm "trash pump" powered by a little 3.5 HP Petter AA1 diesel--unfortunately, it's a 4-stroke, which I am not all too fond of--but it runs well (for a 4-joke anyway) and was cheap enough when I got it at an engine rally and sale at Dublin, NH, last fall. I like British engines, and have several. They, except for this diesel and one petrol engine, and all 2 stroke petrol engines. I have a Villiers WX-11, a Stuart Turner P4, A Stuart Turner P55 twin cylinder, a Petter "M" type 1.5 HP, a Villiers "Junior" 98cc on an Atco mower, a BSA "sloper" 4 stroke, made by Villiers for BSA, on a Ransomes mower, and 1 or 2 others. I also have a nice and rare (<7 ever built!) American Marc 18 cubic inch air cooled, opposed piston (1 cylinder, 2 pistons, 2 crankshafts, no head) diesel military gen set--120/240 VAC, 600 Hz, 1200 watts. The shafts are vertical, the gen set under the engine driven off the center PTO shaft in the gear train between the 2 crankshafts. It uses crankcase pressure like a petrol 2 stroke to scavenge the cylinder, both cases connected by a common transfer passage so they can both supply air to the cylinder's transfer port. The intake of air to the crankcases is by the "third-port" or "3-port" method, where the rising piston's skirt uncovers the inlet port to the crankcase, and the partial vacuum created by the piston's rise draws the air onto the crankcase, to be compressed and forced through the transfer passage and port into the cylinder. There is an intake manifold to these ports, as there are 2, one for each piston. One piston uncovers the transfer port, the other uncovers the exhaust port, thus creating a "uniflow" scavenging like a big Fairbanks-Morse opposed-piston diesel, or a German Junkers OP diesel, or a Detroit Diesel does with intake ports and exhaust valves. Thus, incoming air pushes the burnt gases out thru the exhaust port and fills the cylinder with fresh air, which is trapped between the 2 pistons as they go inwards towards each other, closing the ports as they do. an injector, in the side of the cylinder, in the small space that remains when the pistons come close together at the top of theirstrokes, sprays fuel into the hot air and in standard diesel fashion, it ignites, burns, ans forces both pistons apart again, on the power stroke. Also, when the air is being compressed, the skirts uncover the intake ports, as the upward movement of the pistons makes a slight vacuum in the crankcases, and when these ports open as the pistons near the top of thrie strokes, just before injection and power, the crankcases refill with air to be used to scavenge the burnt gases out once again at the bottom of the stroke when the transfer and exhaust ports open once again. One crankshaft carries the governor, the other a pulley to run the axial-flow cooling fan. This was the only air cooled American Marc diesel ever made, and it was a prototype that the military didn't adopt, so few were made. It, too, uses a "total loss" oiling system, but uses regular diesel motor oil, because the gear case runs in a reservoir of the oil, with some pumoped to the engine for total loss oiling. The whole unit weighs in at about 100 pounds and is quite portable. American Marc made some water cooled versions of this little 7.5 HP diesel for outboard motors, and actually sold some in the early seventies. Just search "Amarc diesel outboard" on youtube to see the water cooled version in action! They are incredibly efficient--I ran a 1,000 watt PS-52 Westy incandescent lamp, an IF model with the "2-CC-8" filament, for 12 hours a day on a job, and had it fed off a 1 gallon can of diesel fuel, and in 7, 12 hour continuous running days of use it had used about 1/4 of the gallon of fuel! This proves the efficiency of 2 strokes VS fuel eating 4 strokes, and since it's an opposed-piston, it is even more efficient that a conventional layout 2 stroke by virtue of work being done on 2 pistons at once! It starts instantly, and runs great, tho it's very loud and noisy because the cooling fins really amplify the diesel knock! It has a 22:1 compression ratio, and has both electric and hand starting--the hand start is a giant clock string that's wound up using a ratchet lever--it takes muscle and about 5 minutes of yanking on the lever to get it wound up for a start! Since the starter currently has an issue with a brush, I have to hand start it! It was built in 1966, the year I was born, and currently has about 17 hours on it, all from me using it! A very cool engine, and I got it on ebay for 200 bucks, along with, for another 200, a one-of-a-kind gen set, one of only 2 ever built, again for the military, but they used another make of gen set instead, in 1944, and is powered by a Keikhaffer Mercury 2 cylinder air cooled rotaty-valve induction petrol 2 stroke engine of 6 HP. It is 120 volts and 1500 watts at 60 HZ. It is hard on petrol but runs sweet--it sounds amazing! I have papers for both engines, that confirm the rarity! Mercury Marine confirmed that only 2 of the prototype gen sets were ever built (they made gazillions of the twin engine tho), and that only 1 of the 2 ever made still exist--and I have it! It currently needs magneto work, as it lost apsrk in storage over the winter a couple of years back, and I haven't had time to really get into the mag issue yet. It ran perfect before the Wico mag decided to give up, tho! Cheers!
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Aug 11, 2015 at 02:08 PM Author: DieselNut
@Ricksbulbs, would you be willing to trade your little diesel for one of these? I have three and only plan to use one. Parts are still available for them too.

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