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C7 Flicker Neon Light Bulb

C7 Flicker Neon Light Bulb

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Here I made some video to see how the Neon light flickers:



Enjoy!

P9290138.JPG P9090117.JPG P9090118.JPG P7220081.JPG

Light Information

Light Information

Lamp
Lamp Type:Clear
Filament/Radiator Type:Flame Shaped Electrodes
Base:Candelabra Edison Screw (E12) (Nickel Plated)
Shape/Finish:C7
Electrical
Wattage:45/100 Watt
Voltage:120 Volts
Physical/Production
Application/Use:Decorative/Christmas Lights

File information

File information

Download: Download this File
Filename:P9090118.JPG
Album name:rjluna2 / Lighted Gallery
Keywords:Lamps
File Size:185 KB
Date added:Sep 09, 2012
Dimensions:1024 x 768 pixels
Displayed:244 times
Date Time:2012:09:09 17:58:59
DateTime Original:2012:09:09 17:58:59
Exposure Bias:0 EV
Exposure Time:1/10 sec
FNumber:f 3.1
Flash:Unknown: 1867120656
Focal length:6.3 mm
ISO:1749418109
Make:OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Model:FE210,X775
Software:1.0
White Balance:2189033472
URL:https://www.lighting-gallery.net/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-69502
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Comments
Danny
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Sep 09, 2012 at 04:26 PM Author: Danny
I use to really love these lamps when I was a kid! id be fascinated with them
DieselNut
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John


jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Sep 10, 2012 at 08:27 AM Author: DieselNut
I have some of those somewhere. Nice "mood" lighting! Where did you get those sockets? I need to set up a good tester like that for testing old Christmas bulbs. I have a little rig, wired in series, using two sockets from an old Christmas light string. I put a known good bulb in one socket and test in the other, so in case the bulb I am testing is shorted, the other one will just light up full power and not blow the breaker or explode.

Preheat Fluorescents forever!
I love diesel engines, rural/farm life and vintage lighting!

Ash
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Sep 10, 2012 at 09:26 AM Author: Ash
I like those too. I have somewhere a soviet E27 version of one (pictures if i find it). It has somewhat weird candle shape a bit like candle with neck

And i also made some slow "mystery blue" flashers from fluorescent starters
rjluna2
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Robert


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Sep 10, 2012 at 10:11 AM Author: rjluna2
Hi John, I found this Candelabra Edison Screw (E12) socket from Amazon.com web site. I brought a few of them. I took piece of wood and screw them on it. I use the extension cord and cut the one with muliple outlet and strip them. I solder the "y" connector on the extension cord and presto: The interchangable series/parallel connection

Pretty, please no more Chinese failure.

DieselNut
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John


jonathon.graves johng917 GeorgiaJohn
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Sep 10, 2012 at 10:16 AM Author: DieselNut
Great design. I did not realize you had set it up to easily swap.

Preheat Fluorescents forever!
I love diesel engines, rural/farm life and vintage lighting!

Ash
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Sep 10, 2012 at 10:26 AM Author: Ash
On DC btw (and those probably can be run on DC - if the ballast is resistor) you can switch between series/parallel with a simple 2 wire switch. This is how the 120/240V switch in computer power supplies etc works
f36t8
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Sep 10, 2012 at 12:48 PM Author: f36t8
A DPDT switch can be wired to act as a series/parallel selector, also on AC supplies. It was sometimes used in the past to extend the lifetime of the short lived 3400 K photographic bulbs, by dimming them when the full light wasn't needed (I learned this from an old manual that came with an old 8 mm cine projector).
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