Author Topic: LPS lamps used for making black fire  (Read 983 times)
GE PM
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LPS lamps used for making black fire « on: February 03, 2024, 10:53:13 PM » Author: GE PM
https://www.youtube.com/shorts/uUGzrS5tpLc
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WorldwideHIDCollectorUSA
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HID, LPS, and preheat fluorescents forever!!!!!!


Worldwide HIDCollectorUSA
Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #1 on: February 03, 2024, 10:54:33 PM » Author: WorldwideHIDCollectorUSA
The person doing the demonstration is sadly burning the lamp base down.
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Desire to collect various light bulbs (especially HID), control gear, and fixtures from around the world.

DISCLAIMER: THE EXPERIMENTS THAT I CONDUCT INVOLVING UNUSUAL LAMP/BALLAST COMBINATIONS SHOULD NOT BE ATTEMPTED UNLESS YOU HAVE THE PROPER KNOWLEDGE. I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY INJURIES.

Econolite03
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Matthew E.


Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #2 on: February 04, 2024, 01:21:29 AM » Author: Econolite03
Torturing it as usual, it’s kinda cringy seeing people in the comments going “why they so expensive?” These *influencers* don’t help.
🤡
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Laurens
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #3 on: February 04, 2024, 05:50:02 AM » Author: Laurens
Be nice, it's completely free!

Before judging people, take a moment to overthink why people do the things the way they do. Do you think that operating a SOX lamp is taught to you when you study chemistry? Or in lab tech class?

I can assure you that in lab tech class, there is not a single mention about the specific burning conditions of SOX lamps. For this type of demontration, you typically use a GP20NA polarimeter lamp which operates in any orientation. But those things run 250 euro if you buy them from the science supply house, and if you can find a SOX at a quarter of that price, it's safe to assume that your average underfunded school would like you to buy *that* instead. But then you get into stuff used by lighting engineers, not by chemistry or physics teachers. So can you expect them to know the correct burning position of any and all SOX lamps?

I think not. I sure didn't know SOX's couldn't run base down when i got mine, until i read the comments on another youtube video of all things, where someone chimed in about it!
Drop them a line about how to properly operate these things, which they have never been taught how to operate. That's how i learned it. A chemist will have a few lab stands and clamps sitting around, and considering the surface of a SOX doesn't get very hot you can make a temporary rig with two stands and two clamps holding the lamp horizontally, with the glass protected by a rag or something. 

And finally, be careful when complaining about influencers. There are a lot of people genuinely good at teaching new, younger audiences like Steve Mould, Dustin (SmarterEveryday) and Kyle Hill (the nuclear physics guy). They're not the same as people promoting disposable electronics, fast fashion and other earth-depleting things.
They might be influencers judging by the audience involvement and their reach, but that's only a good thing - they get a brand new audience interested in cool applications of physics and chemistry. If more people want to try out these things by themselves, that's really good. We need more people experiencing physics and chemistry phenomena in real life, rather than through a screen, and they need to be helped instead of judged if they make mistakes.
Even if that leads to more crowding of the LPS lamp market. If anything, point people towards the new production SOX lamps, to avoid crowding of the 2nd hand collector's market and to help the current producers stay afloat by generating demand.
The generation i teach has never even seen a running LPS lamp on the streets. Let alone have seen it up close.

I've seen it all in the world of antique radios and ham radio. New people who have never touched a vintage radio before often repeat the same mistakes. The greybeards who get huffy and grumpy and essentially make it so the new generation just isn't gonna bother interacting anymore. Let's not make those same mistakes, and spread positivity and knowledge instead!  :love:
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Mandolin Girl
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #4 on: February 04, 2024, 08:04:55 AM » Author: Mandolin Girl
Well said, a few polite words of advice can go a long way.
Rule #1 of the site says to be respectful of other members, that goes for people on the outside as well.
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wide-lite 1000
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #5 on: February 04, 2024, 08:08:01 AM » Author: wide-lite 1000
 We went thru that before . A member politely told a guy on YouTube about not running his SOX lamp base down and even provided documentation to which the guy got pissy and told the LG member "DON'T TELL ME HOW TO RUN MY LAMP ! IT'S MY LAMP , I'LL RUN IT HOWEVER THE HELL I WANT !!!" and then blocked the LG member !
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Rommie
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #6 on: February 04, 2024, 08:12:17 AM » Author: Rommie
That's just what I was thinking of, and if I remember, his rig was built by Sheffield University, and while they should have read the data sheet on SOX lamps they probably didn't care about lamp life.
Some lab lamps only have a life span of a few hundred hours.
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Rommie
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #7 on: February 04, 2024, 10:26:45 AM » Author: Rommie
I can assure you that in lab tech class, there is not a single mention about the specific burning conditions of SOX lamps. For this type of demontration, you typically use a GP20NA polarimeter lamp which operates in any orientation.
The Philips range of spectral lamps, which we have, must all be run cap down. So there is definitely potential for confusion.
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Econolite03
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Matthew E.


Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #8 on: February 04, 2024, 10:34:13 AM » Author: Econolite03
And finally, be careful when complaining about influencers.
Correct, but I’m simply stating my opinion. I’m in the electrical trade and don’t really think highly of them, with all due respect.
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Rommie
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #9 on: February 04, 2024, 11:01:07 AM » Author: Rommie
@ Laurens, we have a couple of lab stands to use for holding lampses, and use both of them for long ones.  :sli:
We've found that the silicone 'fingers' are enough protection from scratches.  :wndr:
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Rommie
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #10 on: February 04, 2024, 11:13:50 AM » Author: Rommie
And they take the heat from LPS lamps reasonably well, although our GEC 280W SOI/H ended up melting the silicone 'fingers' a little bit..! We've wrapped them in Kapton tape now :mrg:
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Laurens
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #11 on: February 04, 2024, 04:34:51 PM » Author: Laurens
That's quite the beast!
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Rommie
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Re: LPS lamps used for making black fire « Reply #12 on: February 04, 2024, 06:37:38 PM » Author: Rommie
That it is..! It's also the only known fully working one, oh crap I've jinxed it now  :mrg:
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