Author Topic: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting  (Read 1988 times)
Solanaceae
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #45 on: May 31, 2015, 08:24:42 AM » Author: Solanaceae
Or you could use a more sophisticated circuit and have one of the color changing LEDs (red for lo/no charge or charging, and green for full).
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #46 on: May 31, 2015, 12:17:21 PM » Author: Medved
Or you could use a more sophisticated circuit and have one of the color changing LEDs (red for lo/no charge or charging, and green for full).

Way better is to keep these LEDs separated: With quick look, you may misinterpret the color, but you will see pretty well, if there is just one or two LED's ON, even when you would be color blind...

And it becomes a standard (dunno how official, but most emergency fixtures behave that way):
Control light ON => Input charging mains connected, fixture working (but does not mean the battery being really charged)
Only main lamp ON, control OFF => Input power missing
Both main and control OFF => fixture faulty or main power OFF too long (as inspections are usually done when the power is running, it likely means input power fault)
Control flashing (only in some fixtures) => Battery running flat; if the main lamp is OFF, it was shut down by the undervoltage protection

Except the flashing (flat battery) signal, all is ensured by just the LED (or the incandescent) in the charging path and normal lamp control (LED is ON only when the charger is running and the battery is connected, what means mainly all fuses are OK, wiring gets power, batteries are not dried out so open circuit,...).
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #47 on: June 01, 2015, 05:53:12 PM » Author: Ash
Why 10 years for the life of the luminaire ? They can easily last many times that - Good plastic does not degrade noticably in 10 years, neither do any of the other components except battery
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #48 on: June 01, 2015, 08:01:16 PM » Author: Solanaceae
You can't expect new lanterns to last that long with cheap manufacturing and crappy parts.
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #49 on: June 01, 2015, 10:53:40 PM » Author: Medved
In big part the 10 years come from the fact the user wants to just refurbish the whole site and with everything (carpet, arrangement, furniture,...) new, he will use even new light fixtures, so the old ones would be scrapped (not much workers would spent any extra time to take too much care when removing old things, except those, which could be sold still at high enough price)
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #50 on: June 03, 2015, 12:44:58 AM » Author: Ash
Now this is wastefull

Here the time between "refurbs" is getting shorter over time as well, places built in the 50s..70s were still original up to at least 90s and sometimes early 2000s - so 30..40 years average, but now places built in the 80..90s are mostly the target of refurbsihmants so 20..30 years. I cannot say i like this trend. But we are mostly not in the 10 year mark yet

In part, the original construction feature and quality is often far greater then what they put in nowadays anyway (cheapest grid ceilings, abandonment of building features like windows and vents, lowering of ceilings... turning great places into yet another low-ceiling boring cubicle space)
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #51 on: June 03, 2015, 04:19:59 PM » Author: Solanaceae
I hate when perfectly working fixtures and bulbs are thrown out or scrapped out, that grinds my gears.  Angry
The people who do remodels and donate the old stuff to habitat are the backbone of habitat and us collectors. On the other hand, this modern society is wasteful and all about doing things fast and effectively, so the trips to habitat will put a "damper" on the project.
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #52 on: June 03, 2015, 05:33:26 PM » Author: Ash
I noticed some tendedncy...

In the original construction (of 90s and earlier), normally the best quality of original material available at the time is used. That mean all electrical, but also structural elements, doors, windows etc

In old refurbishments (done in the "old days", so 80s and before), the refurb planners did recognize that the stuff is good and a lot of it stayed, they changed what they see right and put effort to match it with the original design and make it fit with what is left untouched

In new refurbishments they tend to tear out everything that stands in the way, and if the refurbishment is only partial, you can tell straigth away where the composition does not look right. Also with money spent on tearing down everything, everything (of the new stuff put in) is cheaper in both appearance and actual quality
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #53 on: June 06, 2015, 10:51:43 AM » Author: Medved
The main motivator for the "10 year period" is, with public places all the furniture, carpets, floors, etc are highly worn out, so really needs replacement. The lighting just goes with it.
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #54 on: June 06, 2015, 11:48:12 AM » Author: Ash
Each of the items can be replaced at its own time. There is no relation betwee lighting and furniture or carpets.....

Indoors public place (reception rooms etc) furniture here is mostly made of metal with synthetic sheatings/pillows, and there are few very common models from some manufacturers. It is not uncommon to replace it in spot replacement (when one unit breaks or tears) since the exact same model is still available from the manufacturer, so the replaced unit does not stand out from the others

How common are carpets in public places in the outer world ? Here most public places have stone floors that last pretty much forever, carpets are present mostly in places like theater halls, libraries etc
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Re: American emergency lighting, versus non-american emergency lighting « Reply #55 on: June 07, 2015, 06:44:42 AM » Author: Medved
There is one aspect forming quite strong relation: Once one of these is refurbished, the facility can offer either very limited or no service at all. That means quite high loss (either directly profit, or just the fact they have to pay the all the rents, but are not able to provide the service they are supposed to), so good management looks for ways to eliminate that.

When all the equipment is replaced at once, there is just one shut down and then all equipment becomes new, so no such disruption should be necessary for the next 10 years.
That means quite significant savings, way higher than the remaining value of the still usable equipment.
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