Author Topic: Vintage Fans  (Read 9394 times)
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Vintage Fans « on: October 23, 2015, 07:01:32 AM » Author: rapidstart
Here are  my vintage Australian made table fans.
Top row left: 1940's Revelair. Single speed and no on/off switch. Right: 1950's Revelair.
Bottom row left: 1960's Revelair. Right: 1960's Mistral.
With all these fans, the heads oscillate in a circular motion instead of just swinging from side to side. The heads can be stopped from oscillating (requires a screwdriver with the Revelair's).
I also have a 1950's floor model Revelair.
They were all bought to be used.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #1 on: October 23, 2015, 09:04:54 AM » Author: Lumex120
Here are  my vintage Australian made table fans.
Top row left: 1940's Revelair. Single speed and no on/off switch. Right: 1950's Revelair.
Bottom row left: 1960's Revelair. Right: 1960's Mistral.
With all these fans, the heads oscillate in a circular motion instead of just swinging from side to side. The heads can be stopped from oscillating (requires a screwdriver with the Revelair's).
I also have a 1950's floor model Revelair.
They were all bought to be used.
Nice fans! ;D
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #2 on: October 24, 2015, 05:40:22 AM » Author: rapidstart
Thanks :)
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #3 on: October 24, 2015, 07:57:51 AM » Author: Mercurylamps
My parents have the same Mistral fan bottom right. My mother said that it has been in a family since she was a child. :o

I only have the modern cheap rubbish in my house unfortunately, though it's good to have a remote controlled pedestal fan at the end of the bed for laziness. ;D :-[
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #4 on: October 24, 2015, 08:05:38 AM » Author: rapidstart
All except the 1940's one were bought on Ebay. They still come up from time to time.
If I used the pedestal Revelair in the bedroom, it would blow you out of bed :o ;D
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #5 on: October 24, 2015, 09:49:23 AM » Author: dor123
There was a fan here in Israel from the 80's that was made here by Electrostar:

We had it in my mother home in my room, and at its third speed level, it had an air flow that compete most modern industrial fans.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #6 on: October 25, 2015, 12:43:20 AM » Author: tolivac
Somewhere in my place I have an old Emerson table fan-the oscillation still works-and runs quiet.A freind gave it to me.The older fans are certainly better than newer ones.New ones have low pitch blades so as not to burn out the cheap motor!Older fans had deeper blade pitch-they could move more air!-their motors were strong enough so burnouts weren't a problem-and these still work today-and the fan could be over 60 yrs old!!!
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #7 on: October 25, 2015, 04:29:04 AM » Author: rapidstart
Also the older fans tend to have provision for you to be able to oil the motor bearings without disassembly.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #8 on: October 25, 2015, 10:00:46 AM » Author: dor123
The modern fans with the rotating gird, are junk, they can't be disassembled for cleaning and their air flow is very low compared to the old Electrostar fan we had.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #9 on: October 25, 2015, 07:58:33 PM » Author: rapidstart
The Australian made Mistral brand box fans with the rotating grid that were produced around the mid 70's could be disassembled for cleaning by using a screwdriver. Both the front and back grids could be removed.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #10 on: October 25, 2015, 10:18:29 PM » Author: sol
I have a modern oscillating fan bought in early 2014 (I think) and it runs almost 24/7 at the top of the stairway to try to even out the heating system. Eventually I will get an electrician to install a proper ceiling fan but it makes do for now. When I opened the box, I was shocked (or infuriated or whatever...) that the parts were so cheaply made. The blades, in addition to a low pitch, are very thin. The plastic that makes them is barely thicker than the plastic for ice cream containers. It has "permanently lubricated" bearings, whatever that means. It is starting to show wear as it is quite noisy when started from cold, and it quiets down after about 10-15 minutes.

I'd love to find a good vintage one to use, but I am not willing to pay what they want on eBay plus shipping and exchange to Canada. My favourite ones have transparent blue blades.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #11 on: October 26, 2015, 12:40:16 AM » Author: Mercurylamps
I have a modern oscillating fan bought in early 2014 (I think) and it runs almost 24/7 at the top of the stairway to try to even out the heating system. Eventually I will get an electrician to install a proper ceiling fan but it makes do for now. When I opened the box, I was shocked (or infuriated or whatever...) that the parts were so cheaply made. The blades, in addition to a low pitch, are very thin. The plastic that makes them is barely thicker than the plastic for ice cream containers. It has "permanently lubricated" bearings, whatever that means. It is starting to show wear as it is quite noisy when started from cold, and it quiets down after about 10-15 minutes.

I'd love to find a good vintage one to use, but I am not willing to pay what they want on eBay plus shipping and exchange to Canada. My favourite ones have transparent blue blades.

I remember a cheap pedestal fan I had a couple of years ago. It lasted for one summer then it began to run slowly with the motor humming loud. Spinning the blades by hand I could feel a lot of resistance in the motor bearings.  :-\

The Australian made Mistral brand box fans with the rotating grid that were produced around the mid 70's could be disassembled for cleaning by using a screwdriver. Both the front and back grids could be removed.

Hey rapidstart, wasn't there a Mistral fan sold in the 80s that had the tendency to catch fire/explode? Might have been a fan heater but I've heard stories somewhere.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #12 on: October 26, 2015, 05:17:17 AM » Author: rapidstart
Hey rapidstart, wasn't there a Mistral fan sold in the 80s that had the tendency to catch fire/explode? Might have been a fan heater but I've heard stories somewhere.

You're right, Mercurylamps. It was the box fan model with the sliding variable speed control. One caused a house fire resulting in at least one death. There were other fires as well. People who had this model were told to destroy them. There were no problems with the earlier model with the push button controls but I have a feeling that some of these might have been destroyed as well. My brother had one of each model.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2015, 05:20:14 AM by rapidstart » Logged

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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #13 on: October 26, 2015, 05:57:18 AM » Author: rapidstart
Further research revealed that due to the number of fires, one which caused the death of two brothers, there was a list of models with both push button and slider control published in various media, for these models to be destroyed.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #14 on: October 30, 2015, 03:55:09 AM » Author: Mercurylamps
Just been researching it myself. I only heard about them as I was really young at the time. :-[

I found this on an internet search. A clipping from 1992 telling people to destroy them. I found that rather interesting.
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