Author Topic: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know  (Read 498 times)
rjluna2
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18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « on: December 03, 2021, 03:39:55 PM » Author: rjluna2
Here are these 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know for those who doesn't know about these electrical system terminology :D
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Re: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « Reply #1 on: December 03, 2021, 03:44:59 PM » Author: Econolite03
Thanks for the link Robert. As a future electrician, I often use these terms when working doing wiring and troubleshooting at my house. The AFCI is a fairly new device that I believe will eventually become standard in newer homes. The tricky part is when I go into the trade is remembering the current NEC code as I'm more familiar with the 2014 edition.
 :wndr:
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rjluna2
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Re: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « Reply #2 on: December 03, 2021, 04:10:01 PM » Author: rjluna2
No problem, Matthew ;)
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Re: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « Reply #3 on: December 03, 2021, 07:22:48 PM » Author: Rommie
Here are these 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know for those who doesn't know about these electrical system terminology :D
It should be made clear that the article in this link applies primarily to the US and possibly Canadian electrical systems only. Those in the UK and elsewhere are very different and different rules apply.
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Re: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « Reply #4 on: December 03, 2021, 11:52:00 PM » Author: joseph_125
I believe it's more intended for a US audience but most of it applies to Canadian systems. The most glaring differences being that the national code here is the Canadian Electric Code or CEC and the part about not having to ground plastic device boxes, every Canadian plastic box I've seen does need to be grounded and have metal ground screws for you to connect the ground wire to.

There are some terms that I felt like they omitted though, I think they should also explain what a arc fault is and also current, power, and resistance too and how they relate to voltage. Of course to explain that you probably should briefly explain what power factor is although I think that is way outside the scope for the intended audience of this article.
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Re: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « Reply #5 on: December 13, 2021, 09:43:16 PM » Author: Foxtronix
I assume there's some sort of metal hardware in plastic boxes that electrically connects the device's mounting bracket to the cable's ground wire. Otherwise grounding a plastic box would just be silly.  :lol:
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Re: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « Reply #6 on: December 14, 2021, 12:07:14 AM » Author: joseph_125
Yeah there is, I suppose it's there since some light switches here don't have a grounding lug and the box would be the only way to ground them.
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Re: 18 Common Electrical Terms You Should Know « Reply #7 on: December 17, 2021, 08:02:08 PM » Author: icefoglights
The house I grew up in (built in 1974) had round plastic ceiling boxes with grounding lugs.  The grounding lug was on a metal clip fit on one of the screw bosses and had a spring contact that would press against the fixture mounting screw to ground it.  Most of the original ceiling lights were 2 bulb cluster lights.  They had no internal grounding wires, and instead of using mounting straps, they were just screwed directly to the box, so the grounding clip in the box was the only method of grounding available.

Interestingly enough, the light switches did not have grounding screws, and since they were mounted in plastic boxes, the ground wires were just cut off.

I have seen plastic boxes with similar grounding clips on store shelves recently.
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