Author Topic: Vintage Fans  (Read 9393 times)
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #30 on: March 17, 2016, 11:18:51 PM » Author: nicksfans
I used to be very into collecting vintage ceiling fans. I got rid of most of them several years ago, only keeping the really nice, high-quality ones. I have picked up a couple more since then, though. Most of the ones I have now are Hunter Originals and Casablancas. I also have some antique (1940s and older) oscillating fans by Mimar Products, Emerson, Western Electric, and GE, and a 60s Penncrest reversible box fan.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #31 on: March 18, 2016, 07:32:50 PM » Author: rapidstart
I used to be very into collecting vintage ceiling fans. I got rid of most of them several years ago, only keeping the really nice, high-quality ones. I have picked up a couple more since then, though. Most of the ones I have now are Hunter Originals and Casablancas. I also have some antique (1940s and older) oscillating fans by Mimar Products, Emerson, Western Electric, and GE, and a 60s Penncrest reversible box fan.
A collection of ceiling fans would take up a lot of space if they were all assembled  :o was this the case with yours and the reason you got rid of most of them? You should post some pictures of your fan collection.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #32 on: March 18, 2016, 08:17:33 PM » Author: nicksfans
I installed some in the house as usual, some in the garage, and the rest were stored disassembled with the motors hanging up in the basement and the blades in boxes. I got rid of most of them because I lost interest and because I was about to move.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #33 on: March 18, 2016, 11:18:19 PM » Author: TheUniversalDave1
After four years of neglect (by me) I finally got my 1940's Homart Cooler up and running. I had intended to restore it, but life got in the way. I kept putting it off until I lost almost all the pieces, and I eventually dismissed it as being a lost cause. But yesterday, I saw the lone fan housing, and I said "Enough's enough, today's the day." I just about tore the house apart trying to locate all the parts, but I did it. I had to go to Tractor Supply Co and buy two new set screws for $1.09, but I can handle that. The fan is now resting happily in the window doing its job. Unrestored of course, but working.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #34 on: March 20, 2016, 12:31:58 PM » Author: LampLover
After four years of neglect (by me) I finally got my 1940's Homart Cooler up and running. I had intended to restore it, but life got in the way. I kept putting it off until I lost almost all the pieces, and I eventually dismissed it as being a lost cause. But yesterday, I saw the lone fan housing, and I said "Enough's enough, today's the day." I just about tore the house apart trying to locate all the parts, but I did it. I had to go to Tractor Supply Co and buy two new set screws for $1.09, but I can handle that. The fan is now resting happily in the window doing its job. Unrestored of course, but working.

Wow! that is my holy grail of fans. I always wanted a older fan that knew how to move air (Not the cheapo China fans which can't even blow a candle out) I saw one on eBay but I lost the bidding war. Oh well! I guess my 26 year old Patton High Velocity Air Circulator will have to do
I know that it is a two speed belt driven fan how loud is it on high?
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #35 on: March 20, 2016, 09:23:33 PM » Author: Bert
After four years of neglect (by me) I finally got my 1940's Homart Cooler up and running. I had intended to restore it, but life got in the way. I kept putting it off until I lost almost all the pieces, and I eventually dismissed it as being a lost cause. But yesterday, I saw the lone fan housing, and I said "Enough's enough, today's the day." I just about tore the house apart trying to locate all the parts, but I did it. I had to go to Tractor Supply Co and buy two new set screws for $1.09, but I can handle that. The fan is now resting happily in the window doing its job. Unrestored of course, but working.

I have the same problem, several projects sitting around with nothing being done to them.

Looks like a really nice fan, puts any modern fan to shame I'm sure. Hard to find things that well made these days. Thats why we have to hold on to all this old stuff and do repairs when needed. I really makes me sad when people throw out perfectly good working appliances/equipment/ect. and replace it with a new one just because a new one is more energy efficient or stylish. All the old ends up in a landfill and the new stuff won't even last ten years and not made to be repaired, it's made to be disposable.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #36 on: March 20, 2016, 10:57:18 PM » Author: TheUniversalDave1
The Homart Cooler is extremely quiet. The motor is silent. The loudest part is all the air wooshing by.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #37 on: April 01, 2016, 06:58:45 AM » Author: rapidstart
Here is my circa 1950's Australian-made Revelair pedestal fan. It has a cast iron base and is really heavy. The speed control is on the back of the head. Like the other Revelair's and Mistral brand I own, it has the gyro oscillating mechanism. This fan is really intended for factory/shop use rather then domestic. You really wouldn't want to use it in a bedroom  ;D
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #38 on: April 01, 2016, 07:10:40 AM » Author: rapidstart
After four years of neglect (by me) I finally got my 1940's Homart Cooler up and running. I had intended to restore it, but life got in the way. I kept putting it off until I lost almost all the pieces, and I eventually dismissed it as being a lost cause. But yesterday, I saw the lone fan housing, and I said "Enough's enough, today's the day." I just about tore the house apart trying to locate all the parts, but I did it. I had to go to Tractor Supply Co and buy two new set screws for $1.09, but I can handle that. The fan is now resting happily in the window doing its job. Unrestored of course, but working.
Neat. I guess these could only be installed in double-hung sash windows?
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #39 on: April 02, 2016, 05:07:03 AM » Author: Mercurylamps
Here is my circa 1950's Australian-made Revelair pedestal fan. It has a cast iron base and is really heavy. The speed control is on the back of the head. Like the other Revelair's and Mistral brand I own, it has the gyro oscillating mechanism. This fan is really intended for factory/shop use rather then domestic. You really wouldn't want to use it in a bedroom  ;D

Built to last back then and still works decades later. Lets see if the Chinese rubbish will last as long. What a beautiful Revelair fan you have. 8)
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #40 on: April 02, 2016, 05:47:19 AM » Author: rapidstart
Built to last back then and still works decades later. Lets see if the Chinese rubbish will last as long. What a beautiful Revelair fan you have. 8)

Thanks. $20 off Ebay. Needed a couple of minor mechanical and cosmetic repairs but nothing too serious.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #41 on: July 18, 2016, 06:12:01 AM » Author: LampLover
Found another fan  ;D
This time a true vintage fan from the 1960's

The other day I found a really neat General Electric Floor Circulator F16F3 (AKA Hassock Fan). I believe the fan is from the 1960's and it is almost all metal (except the plastic top) I would say mine is in poor shape as there is some surface rust but the plastic top is not cracked or broken (Like the ones I have seen on the famous auction site going for big bucks). So the fan runs OK but it stops almost immediately after removing power so I think it just needs some oil but my question is where does the oil go into the motor in this fan? I have had good luck with other trash find fans before (A 20" Patton High Velocity Air Circulator from 1990) but that fan I had to totally disassemble the motor to get to the bearings. I don't see a way to do that with the GE fan without destroying it.
So is there a way to save this really neat fan? I already have the right type of oil (SAE 20 Non-detergent motor oil). I just need to know where to put it so it could get to the bearings

Thanks
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #42 on: July 20, 2016, 01:19:39 AM » Author: rapidstart
Found another fan  ;D
This time a true vintage fan from the 1960's

The other day I found a really neat General Electric Floor Circulator F16F3 (AKA Hassock Fan). I believe the fan is from the 1960's and it is almost all metal (except the plastic top) I would say mine is in poor shape as there is some surface rust but the plastic top is not cracked or broken (Like the ones I have seen on the famous auction site going for big bucks). So the fan runs OK but it stops almost immediately after removing power so I think it just needs some oil but my question is where does the oil go into the motor in this fan? I have had good luck with other trash find fans before (A 20" Patton High Velocity Air Circulator from 1990) but that fan I had to totally disassemble the motor to get to the bearings. I don't see a way to do that with the GE fan without destroying it.
So is there a way to save this really neat fan? I already have the right type of oil (SAE 20 Non-detergent motor oil). I just need to know where to put it so it could get to the bearings

Thanks

I hope someone in your country on this list can help with the oiling information. Good luck.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #43 on: July 20, 2016, 07:45:00 AM » Author: Medved
Depends on the bearing design.
Some of them have felt "sponge" reservoir behind the bearing (usually a bronze ball with a hole for the shaft through it), so you have to soak that sponge.

But many designs use just solid state lubricants (usually graphite, recently MoS2) mixed into the bushing material (usually made using a sintered powder technology). With these the problem is usually not that much the missing lubricant, but the accumulated dirt.

Some design use sintered powder metal bushing, but soaked with an oil. Then the oil is to be applied onto the bushing ball and it should be let to soak in.

Generally the dirt uses to be the prime cause of stuck shafts, so as first I would try to disassemble it and clean all surfaces (even inside of the bushing). Very frequently that is way sufficient to make the thing working again. Or maximum check the metal surface on the shaft and if necessary, renew the polishing.
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Re: Vintage Fans « Reply #44 on: September 15, 2018, 08:14:56 AM » Author: Cole D.
Found another fan  ;D
This time a true vintage fan from the 1960's

The other day I found a really neat General Electric Floor Circulator F16F3 (AKA Hassock Fan). I believe the fan is from the 1960's and it is almost all metal (except the plastic top) I would say mine is in poor shape as there is some surface rust but the plastic top is not cracked or broken (Like the ones I have seen on the famous auction site going for big bucks). So the fan runs OK but it stops almost immediately after removing power so I think it just needs some oil but my question is where does the oil go into the motor in this fan? I have had good luck with other trash find fans before (A 20" Patton High Velocity Air Circulator from 1990) but that fan I had to totally disassemble the motor to get to the bearings. I don't see a way to do that with the GE fan without destroying it.
So is there a way to save this really neat fan? I already have the right type of oil (SAE 20 Non-detergent motor oil). I just need to know where to put it so it could get to the bearings

Thanks


I know this was a while ago, but you can oil that motor, if you drill a small hole in the gray cap on the bottom. Then you can pop off the cap and there should be some felt in there you can oil. And you are correct that fan was made in the 1960s or 70s, I can tell by the beige color. It also came in gray or aqua in earlier years. The plastic top is original too.
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