Author Topic: Amateur radio operators here?  (Read 3876 times)
RyanF40T12
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #45 on: February 17, 2016, 08:24:14 PM » Author: RyanF40T12
My friend, the only thing you'll have to ever worry about on that thing is wearing the buttons out :)  Congrats!!!
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Binarix128
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #46 on: November 20, 2020, 10:58:17 PM » Author: Binarix128
I'm planning to put on air a little analog tv station for experimental purposes.
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #47 on: November 21, 2020, 10:56:29 AM » Author: Mandolin Girl
I've taken my licence as far as the Intermediate level here in the UK, which does give me access to higher powered kit.  8)
But as we have no way to get an aerial erected outside, and we're just using hand held radios there's no point in taking it any further at the moment.  :wndr:
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sox35
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #48 on: November 21, 2020, 11:07:43 AM » Author: sox35
I've had my licence since 1983 (ye gods that makes me eligible for the Old Timer's Association  :poof:) but as Sammi says, with no way of getting metalwork in the air we can't really do much from here  :(
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Ria in Aberdeen
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #49 on: November 21, 2020, 11:37:31 AM » Author: Binarix128
Yeah, I would like to take the license, I can get the Novice range by age. I just need to investigate radio a bit further and have free time.

If we move to the countryside, a wireless telegraph would be helpful to communicate and not by spyware like WhatsApp.  8;)
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #50 on: November 21, 2020, 04:16:31 PM » Author: Medved
Yeah, I would like to take the license, I can get the Novice range by age. I just need to investigate radio a bit further and have free time.

If we move to the countryside, a wireless telegraph would be helpful to communicate and not by spyware like WhatsApp.  8;)

Well, with a wireless telegraph, mainly at SW, the whole world would be listening to you...
I just remember when trying my first contacts (under the ham club license), whenwe were anxious to speaking to the open, the tutor just used to utter "Dont worry, you will be heard by just few thousends of people..." :D
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #51 on: November 21, 2020, 06:01:03 PM » Author: sox35
I remember when I first got licensed back in 1983 or so, I had the good fortune to make contact with another station in Denmark. On the 2m (145 MHz) band, with just 2.5 watts from my end, it was quite an achievement, and would not have been possible except for very unusual atmospheric conditions. I mentioned this to a fellow radio club member who happened to be Danish, although he had lived in the UK for many years.

I don't recall his exact words, and one or two of them were quite "colourful" shall we say, but it was something along the lines of "You ****** ******, I've lived in this country for 30 years, and I've never managed to work back home"  8;) :lol:
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Ria in Aberdeen
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #52 on: November 21, 2020, 06:10:32 PM » Author: Mandolin Girl
The radio club we went to while I was studying for my licence has a member who is a Morse man to his fingertips, and professed to never speaking on the radio...  :wndr:
But we have photographic evidence of him actually using a microphone.!!  >:D
One day we might use it...  :lol:
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #53 on: November 21, 2020, 08:53:57 PM » Author: Binarix128
Well, if we setup a wireless or wired telegraph of course that we will use a top secret morse code. I think that a license is not needed for a wired telegraph, at least here. But I think that 1 or 2 watts of power is enough to broadcast at a few kilometers and not the whole world or another galaxy.  ;D
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #54 on: November 22, 2020, 01:28:34 AM » Author: Medved
Well, if we setup a wireless or wired telegraph of course that we will use a top secret morse code. I think that a license is not needed for a wired telegraph, at least here. But I think that 1 or 2 watts of power is enough to broadcast at a few kilometers and not the whole world or another galaxy.  ;D

For a secret morse code, no ham license will help, as using any secret codes is a violation of the license anyway...

And regarding the power: Is there is a signal path (beside the weak scattering), the power does not have that much impact anymore, Voyager probe has barely few W transmitter (with a signal bandwidth similar to what the Morse needs) and yet it is possible to receive its transmissions from nearly the edge of the solar system...
And when there is no signal path, you start to need insane power even for very short distances.
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #55 on: November 22, 2020, 08:43:27 AM » Author: sox35
Here in the UK, anything that isn't specifically exempt from requiring a licence needs one. The exceptions that I know of are cordless phones, mobile (cell) phones (which are covered by the licence issued to the network operators) and the 446 MHz hand portable radios that are commonly available, which are limited to 0.5W and cannot use anything other than the antenna fixed to the radio. Plus of course wi-fi networking and certain medical devices.

All other radio communication systems, amateur or professional (i.e. taxis) need to be licensed by Ofcom.
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Ria in Aberdeen
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #56 on: November 22, 2020, 09:34:28 AM » Author: Binarix128
Yeah, most satellites broadcast with a few watts, but their signal is aimed to the earth and no spread everywhere, they would need a couple of kilowatts to reach the earth if the signal is not aimed, and that's why TV and radio stations uses few KW to broadcast.

I think that there's no problem by using a secret code over a wired telegraph, because no one else is going to listen to it unless they tap the line.
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #57 on: November 23, 2020, 02:52:50 AM » Author: tolivac
When I dealt with commercial TV and radio-50Kw was highest for AM stations.35-50Kw for High band analog TVCh7-13.Then for Lo band VHF TV-25Kw.For UHF TV up to 240Kw!These were ANALOG TV transmitters power was measured at peak of Horizontal-vety sync pules.Now for Short Wave-what I do now-100Kw,250Kw and 500Kw.These have to travel from the transmitter to all the way 'round the world.And for broadcast-the atmosphere.This puts resistence to the signal-hence high power to overcome it.For incoming signals from space the ionosphere and atmosphere.The UHF or higher signals for deep space can overcome the issues better than lower frequency broadcast.SW signals bounce off the ionoshpere-back to earth,than back up again until the signal reaches the intended target area.And on some of the SW antennas used at the plant I work in we can vary the takeoff angle and direction of the signal.Some SW station have their antennas on GIANT turntables or the antenna structure can be rotated for direction.a VERY GIANT version of a rotatable TV receive antenna or "ham" antenna.
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Re: Amateur radio operators here? « Reply #58 on: November 23, 2020, 04:48:03 AM » Author: Medved
Here in the UK, anything that isn't specifically exempt from requiring a licence needs one. The exceptions that I know of are cordless phones, mobile (cell) phones (which are covered by the licence issued to the network operators) and the 446 MHz hand portable radios that are commonly available, which are limited to 0.5W and cannot use anything other than the antenna fixed to the radio. Plus of course wi-fi networking and certain medical devices.

All other radio communication systems, amateur or professional (i.e. taxis) need to be licensed by Ofcom.


Here (and I would guess it is the case for the UK too) ANY and ALL radio transmitters/radiators require a license.
But many (mainly low power) services have what is called "general license", a license covering the use of the devices by anyone for the purpose and with technicalparameters defined in the license, so ordinary customers dont have to care, they just have to stick to use of certified devices (part of the manufacturers/importers CE selfcertification).
That includes CB (40 channels in the 27MHz, 4W, narrow band FM voice; so the higher power amplifiers are violating the license, so are illegal without special license for them), model remote controls, recently model telemetry, remote locks, WiFi (max 100mW ERP, so using e.g. high gain directional antena without reducing the transmitter output power is illegal), car radars (used by ACC,...), but even microwave ovens (because quite strong leakahe power from radio communication perspective; there the license specifies mainly the band where the magnetrons are allowed to operate and the leaking power), and so on.
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