Author Topic: Working on your car  (Read 12737 times)
CEB1993
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #30 on: November 18, 2017, 09:28:16 AM » Author: CEB1993
Nope... this exhaust is a "bolt on" exhaust that is simply bolted onto the existing pipe, after
removing the stock exhaust muffler. The stock catalytic converter is still on the bike.
The other thing I've noticed is that when revving the bike at high rpms, the exhaust spits out
A LOT of fire... which looks really really threatening, yet cool... however... I've read that
it's a sign that the bike is either running rich or lean. Not sure if that might have something
to do with it...?

@CEB1993, Subaru... what about the Subaru Impreza WRX? That car has plenty get up and go kind of power,
despite the 2.0Liter engine. It's also lightweight

I would love to get a Subaru WRX!  It's about the same size as my current VW Jetta and it has serious pickup. 0 to 60 in under 6 seconds  ;D Affordable too! 

I do need the Outback's cargo space and winter weather capabilities for my trip up north. I'll be living in New York State for one year going to graduate school. Someday, I'll get a fun car  ;D
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Mercurylamps
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #31 on: November 18, 2017, 10:11:07 AM » Author: Mercurylamps
Black tape over the check engine light  :D I tried resetting the light by unplugging the battery and plugging it back in, but the light just came on again one day later. I need a new catalytic converter, which I'm not worried about since the car still runs perfectly. My only concern is that there could be another more serious problem that the check engine light could also represent. It's annoying how the single warning light could represent 25 different malfunctions in the car from something as small as a loose gas cap to something as big as engine misfiring.

Invest in an OBDII reader. It is very handy and a money saver.
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suzukir122
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suzukir123
Re: Working on your car « Reply #32 on: November 18, 2017, 10:17:50 AM » Author: suzukir122
The Subaru WRX is one of my favorite cars... not just because of the way it sounds, but because it's fast,
and it looks amazing. May not be as fast as my motorcycle, but it *could* possibly keep up. ;)
That car, and the dodge neon SRT, are two of my favorites.

That being said, I have seen a couple videos of the Subaru WRX failing/throwing a rod, etc. So maybe they
would require a lot of maintenance. That I don't know. But, I do want to buy one.
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RyanF40T12
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #33 on: November 18, 2017, 11:22:44 AM » Author: RyanF40T12
The sound of a 4 or 6 cylinder engine with any type of loud exhaust system to me is like someone running fingernails down a chalkboard.  Just could never learn to like it.  I just dismiss it as nothing worth looking at. 

HOWEVER-  This sound on the other hand.. has my full and undivided attention.

https://www.facebook.com/ClassicAmericanMusclesCar/videos/1513175528766333/
« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 11:35:22 AM by RyanF40T12 » Logged

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suzukir122
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suzukir123
Re: Working on your car « Reply #34 on: November 18, 2017, 11:41:06 AM » Author: suzukir122
I'm not much of a fan of the 6 cylinder sounds either... especially the V6. But 4 cylinder engines, and cummins diesel
engines, are my two favorite kind. Everyones different lol... the main types of engine sounds I don't
like are single cylinder, V-Twins, L-Twins, and parallel twins. Those will never phase me no matter how loud.

The muscle car in that video, what engine does that have? Now THOSE kind of cars are also interesting to me. Can't
forget the muscle cars.

« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 11:50:59 AM by suzukir122 » Logged

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Lodge
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #35 on: November 18, 2017, 02:21:43 PM » Author: Lodge
Black tape over the check engine light  :D I tried resetting the light by unplugging the battery and plugging it back in, but the light just came on again one day later. I need a new catalytic converter, which I'm not worried about since the car still runs perfectly. My only concern is that there could be another more serious problem that the check engine light could also represent. It's annoying how the single warning light could represent 25 different malfunctions in the car from something as small as a loose gas cap to something as big as engine misfiring.

The OBDii will actually allow for a few thousand items not including the manufacturing specific items which might be another thousand or more, and lots of the issues are pretty minor, some will even self reset when the fault is intermittent, others have a two warm up cycles to reset, and some have a 40 warm up cycle and some are permanent and have to reset with a reader... If you are worried about it, either get a reader, they are cheap and can be found online for under $20, or go to an autoparts store, most have loaner tools, or borrow one from a friend to learn what the code is, and once you know the codes you can search them up online or post them here and I'll let you know what I know about them...   

And just so you know what a warm up cycle is, the coolant has to reach 160°F and has to rise at least 40°F which is expected  if the engine is started cold and allowed to be driven until it reaches normal temps, so it replicates real world conditions where you turn the engine off for several hours and then start it up and go for drive of several miles, and if it doesn't see a fault in the last 2 or 40 the OBDii will turn on the light, but if it happens again the counter resets..

If you need a new Cat odds are good the O2 sensors are not detecting exhaust O2 levels in range and this will trigger the light every time because they monitor both the input before the cat and the output after the cat to make sure the cat is working... 
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Mercurylamps
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #36 on: November 18, 2017, 07:54:55 PM » Author: Mercurylamps
I don't even know how to change the battery in this car? Cars are getting more and more cramped in the engine bay. ::) >:(

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Lodge
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #37 on: November 18, 2017, 08:05:20 PM » Author: Lodge
I don't even know how to change the battery in this car? Cars are getting more and more cramped in the engine bay. ::) >:(



You lucky it's not a Dodge Stratus, with those you need to jack up the car, place the axle stands under it, remove the drivers side wheel, pull the skirt off and then undo the cables and remove the battery, and of course they can't give you enough cables to pull it out and remove the cables  so you have to stuff your hand in there and hope you don't short out the terminals with the wrench, why they had to put it behind the front bumper, I really don't know they should of stuck it under the rear seat, it would of lasted longer and been easier to deal with, or stuffed it in the trunk..
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Aveoguy22
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #38 on: November 18, 2017, 09:05:12 PM » Author: Aveoguy22
I don't even know how to change the battery in this car? Cars are getting more and more cramped in the engine bay. ::) >:(



looks as simple as removing the intake snorkel and then the hold down and cables.  simple compared to some designs out there
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CEB1993
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #39 on: November 18, 2017, 09:15:17 PM » Author: CEB1993
I don't even know how to change the battery in this car? Cars are getting more and more cramped in the engine bay. ::) >:(



Maybe the battery is in the trunk of your car.  Both the BMW X5 of my mother's and the BMW 330i of my brother's has the battery/battery terminals in the trunk or cargo area.  Some cars have the terminals in separate areas from the actual battery.  Typical complicated BMW design ???

I can't imagine a Nissan having the battery anywhere else besides under the hood.  Is the red tab on the right side of your picture the positive terminal for the battery?
« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 09:37:08 PM by CEB1993 » Logged

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Aveoguy22
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #40 on: November 18, 2017, 09:40:48 PM » Author: Aveoguy22
Maybe the battery is in the trunk of your car.  Both the BMW X5 of my mother's and the BMW 330i of my brother's has the battery/battery terminals in the trunk or cargo area.  Some cars have the terminals in separate areas from the actual battery.  Typical complicated BMW design ???

I can't imagine a Nissan having the battery anywhere else besides under the hood.  Is the red tab on the right side of your picture the positive terminal for the battery?
its on the drivers side in the pic, behind the snorkel
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Mercurylamps
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #41 on: November 18, 2017, 11:10:38 PM » Author: Mercurylamps
Maybe the battery is in the trunk of your car.  Both the BMW X5 of my mother's and the BMW 330i of my brother's has the battery/battery terminals in the trunk or cargo area.  Some cars have the terminals in separate areas from the actual battery.  Typical complicated BMW design ???

I can't imagine a Nissan having the battery anywhere else besides under the hood.  Is the red tab on the right side of your picture the positive terminal for the battery?

Yep it's hidden under the air intake snorkel as aveoguy22 mentioned, it's a cramped and crowded engine bay unfortunately.

I haven't bothered replacing it yet as it has started raining so will wait for a clearer day to put a new one in. The battery is fairly old and I'm replacing it with a Supercharge battery.
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Medved
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #42 on: November 19, 2017, 03:21:47 AM » Author: Medved
Black tape over the check engine light  :D I tried resetting the light by unplugging the battery and plugging it back in, but the light just came on again one day later. I need a new catalytic converter, which I'm not worried about since the car still runs perfectly. My only concern is that there could be another more serious problem that the check engine light could also represent. It's annoying how the single warning light could represent 25 different malfunctions in the car from something as small as a loose gas cap to something as big as engine misfiring.

First are you sure the bad cat could ever cause the light to come on at all? Because except the newest vehicles, the diagnostic is able to just detect defects usually leading to cat malfunction or loss of efficiency, but not the bad cat itself. So I would guess there is some other defect causing the light to go on and maybe even killing the cat.
And to be sure, the only option you have is to read out all the DTC's and start from there. That is the main reason, why the diagnostic functionality is there at all.
The thing is, there is very high chance there is really some severe defect really threatening the engine, the cat is just its consequence...
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Aveoguy22
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #43 on: November 19, 2017, 04:13:47 AM » Author: Aveoguy22
First are you sure the bad cat could ever cause the light to come on at all? Because except the newest vehicles, the diagnostic is able to just detect defects usually leading to cat malfunction or loss of efficiency, but not the bad cat itself. So I would guess there is some other defect causing the light to go on and maybe even killing the cat.
And to be sure, the only option you have is to read out all the DTC's and start from there. That is the main reason, why the diagnostic functionality is there at all.
The thing is, there is very high chance there is really some severe defect really threatening the engine, the cat is just its consequence...
]

it can absolutely detect a bad cat.  even the older obd2 vehicles can sense that.  there is a leading and trailing o2 sensor that monitors the cat itself.  most older vehicles will have a light for that reason.
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Lodge
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Re: Working on your car « Reply #44 on: November 19, 2017, 04:15:07 AM » Author: Lodge
   First are you sure the bad cat could ever cause the light to come on at all?


It will trigger the malfunction indicator light, when it fails, even if you melt it or remove it, the upsteam and downstream O2 sensors will see the same amount of O2 which is indicative of an issue with the cat, and while it will ignore this during the first couple of minutes of driving while the cat gets up to proper operating temp, it will eventually trigger the light and then you will see P0420, P0421, P0422, P0430, P0431 or P0432 error codes when you read it, which are all catalyst is below threshold efficiency errors, normally the upstream O2 sensor output will fluctuate and the downstream will remain pretty constant but the more they start to follow each other the more likely there is an issue..

But before replacing a cat, check to see if its actually damaged they are not normally a common failure parts, and if your doing it yourself don't toss it out, the catalyst comb inside the cat is worth money at any scrap yard, even if you melted it or busted it, they do contain metals like Platinum, Palladium, and Rhodium and all three are precious metals, even if your just going to ram a pipe though it, collect the comb pieces in a bucket...
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