1   General / General Discussion / Re: Home Depot getting rid of Philips & fluorescent?  on: Today at 12:21:11 AM 
Started by xmaslightguy - Last post by xmaslightguy
I did some google'ing...
From what I can tell, the CO ban is for any fluorescent with a CRI of 87 or higher CFL/T5/T8/T12/etc.
(And those with CRI below 87 are subject to previously adopted federal regulations)

Not sure on this, but I think that effectively bans all current fluorescents?? (except specialty stuff)?


-----------
edit:
If it doesn't, they will be banned .. take a look at this crap:
    On and after January 1, 2024, a person shall not manufacture, distribute, sell, or offer for sale in Colorado any new compact fluorescent lamp with a screw- or bayonet-type base; and
    On and after January 1, 2025, a person shall not manufacture, distribute, sell, or offer for sale in Colorado any linear fluorescent lamp or any compact fluorescent lamp with a pin-type base.

 2   General / General Discussion / Re: What's With All the Metal Halide Cobra's?  on: February 03, 2023, 11:53:14 PM 
Started by suzukir122 - Last post by joseph_125
Yeah, there's some MH remaining in Toronto but a bunch of them got LEDized back in the fall. Most of the gumballs are still the old MH Cooper URBs but any replacement one is a LED Cyclone Kanata. Granted they look pretty similar to each other so most people won't be able to tell the difference.
 3   General / Off-Topic / Re: Off Grid Living  on: February 03, 2023, 09:54:46 PM 
Started by merc - Last post by DetroitTwoStroke
I like the ideas and creative thoughts here!

As for batteries, deep cycle lead acid should be sufficient (typical automotive batteries aren't deep cycle rated.) They are less expensive and somewhat safer than lithium batteries. I maintained a set of GC2 batteries (golf car batteries) in our scissor lift at work, and they lasted 9 years. Just check the battery acid level periodically and add only distilled water.
Or you could use deep cycle sealed lead acid batteries, then you won't need to water them. SLA batteries are often used in deep cycling applications, such as battery backups and emergency lighting. Typical life expectancy in those applications is 5-7 years.
 4   General / General Discussion / Re: What's With All the Metal Halide Cobra's?  on: February 03, 2023, 06:48:34 PM 
Started by suzukir122 - Last post by suzukir122
I remember near the Columbus area had a lot of Metal Halides, although the ones I saw weren't Cobras. There are tons of places I've yet to
visit in Columbus, so maybe I'll see Metal Halide Cobras along the way lol
 5   General / General Discussion / Re: What's With All the Metal Halide Cobra's?  on: February 03, 2023, 05:59:26 PM 
Started by suzukir122 - Last post by wide-lite 1000
 All of the MH cobras here in Grove City seem to be going the way of the dinosaur ! There's only one stretch of Stringtown road that still has them for now . 
 6   General / General Discussion / Re: What if the world adopted Thomas Edison’s DC power distribution system?  on: February 03, 2023, 05:26:56 PM 
Started by WorldwideHIDCollectorUSA - Last post by AngryHorse
Before the grid existed, street lighting using tungsten lamps in the UK were run from large PETTER oil engine’s  :D
I have a book on the history of PETTER engines, and back in the early early days, towns would have 3 street lighting engineers, two guys would start/run and look after the engine when it went dark back at the engine/generator house, and another would cycle around town looking after the lamps and changing them if needed according to the book! 8)
Imagine what a fantastic job that would of been?
 7   General / General Discussion / Re: What if the world adopted Thomas Edison’s DC power distribution system?  on: February 03, 2023, 05:18:38 PM 
Started by WorldwideHIDCollectorUSA - Last post by Mandolin Girl
'The problem of transmitting electricity over longer distances became a recognized engineering roadblock to electric power distribution, with many less-than-satisfactory solutions tested by lighting companies. But the mid-1880s saw a breakthrough with the development of functional transformers that allowed AC power to be "stepped up" to much a higher voltage for transmission, then dropped down to a lower voltage near the end user. Compared to direct current, AC had much cheaper transmission costs and greater economies of scale — with large AC generating plants capable of supplying whole cities and regions — which lead to the use of AC spreading rapidly. '

That's what they said in this article about how it was done in the early days, and that's what I thought the OP meant.  :wndr:
 8   General / General Discussion / Re: What if the world adopted Thomas Edison’s DC power distribution system?  on: February 03, 2023, 05:16:33 PM 
Started by WorldwideHIDCollectorUSA - Last post by AngryHorse
For the longest time, I have wondered what our world would be like if all countries used Edison’s DC power distribution system for most lighting and appliances instead of George Westinghouse’s AC power distribution system?
A slight clarification, AC power was Teslas idea, George Westinghouse only funded it  ;)
 9   Lamps / Vintage & Antique / Re: Why the British neon floodlight lamp were called NE/H  on: February 03, 2023, 05:10:50 PM 
Started by dor123 - Last post by Olav
A small addition to this post from a catalogue.
As far as I know, these lamps did not exist in Germany.



Source: SIERAY-catalogue, May 1937



Source: SIERAY-catalogue, May 1937



Source: SIERAY-catalogue, May 1937


I didn't know there were different colors.
 10   General / General Discussion / Re: What if the world adopted Thomas Edison’s DC power distribution system?  on: February 03, 2023, 05:01:52 PM 
Started by WorldwideHIDCollectorUSA - Last post by AngryHorse
Their already starting to use it?, I believe the latest power distribution network idea is 800 KV DC
https://youtu.be/u4m84EvDUtc
Pages: Next > [1] 2 3 ... 10
© 2005-2023 Lighting-Gallery.net | SMF 2.0.19 | SMF © 2021, Simple Machines | Terms and Policies